Sound Choice

Go down

Sound Choice

Post  Austin Cruse on Fri Nov 16, 2012 6:45 pm

Mr. Hart stopped the film the other day to explain to our class how if you can prove a director is careful, then showing a clip for "too long" was done on purpose. The director must have done that for some reason, and it wasn't an accident. While watching this film, I noticed that ever since the mortars blew up the forest, there was a strange tune playing in the background. It gives you an uneasy feeling. This tune plays for a very long period of time, no matter what was being shown in the film. Even when they were shaking the trees, smiling, and having a good time, all you could hear was these strange tune. I think the director put it in this film for so long for a certain reason. Also, the ringing sound frequently comes back, adding to the uneasy feeling This director has obviously been careful, so it would be smart to assume that these sound choices were picked for a bigger reason than just background noise.

Austin Cruse

Posts : 3
Join date : 2012-11-16

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Sound Choice

Post  Aniesa on Fri Nov 16, 2012 8:16 pm

yea I noticed it as well.
It kinda gave me an uneasy feeling the entire time, as though everything wasn't what it seemed.
It actually reminded me of this (nightmare inducing) tune from the first generation Pokemon game, in which you go to Lavender Town and this eerie tune plays. Granted, that in there it was suppose to be creepy since it was basically a large graveyard, i couldn't help but think that the tune in the movie could have been a type of foreshadowing or something. I'm not really sure. But i do think it was put there on purpose and for a very valid reason. A reason that may/may not/already shown itself in the movie. Or perhaps the tune, much like the stork from earlier, is just the tip of an iceburg to a deeper meaning that only a trained eye can see. (or maybe i'm overthinking it and still just suffering from the trauma that Lavender Town's theme left on me and i'm just taking out that trauma and assuming the tune in the movie is just like it.In that case just ignore me.)

Aniesa

Posts : 11
Join date : 2012-11-16

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Sound Choice

Post  Michelle Lyn Luna on Fri Nov 16, 2012 10:06 pm

I'm glad I'm not the only one partially scarred from the Lavender Town music.
Back on topic though, I'm not 100% certain I've noticed the music directly. The uneasy feeling brought on by the music? Yes, of course, watching this film is very uneasy-ifying.
I'm somewhat more focused on the ringing and, I don't know if this relates to the tune or is just me noticing something wrong, the muffling of sounds. The ringing immediately makes me think it's supposed to be, or is, that pitch that makes people scared. I recall Mr. Hart talking about that in the Jaws unit, but I can't exactly recall if it is a specific pitch or just a particular interval of pitches, or if this is even it. That's just my first thought with the ringing, as it is very unsettling. The muffling I've noticed has been happening, occasionally in combination with the ringing, since the bombs (possibly sooner, but that's how I've noticed it in my biased mind). I'm not sure if I mentioned it in another post somewhere, but this makes me think that these sounds we hear or don't hear are what Florya is hearing. When one is exposed to a bomb at close range, that damages the eardrums, causing a muffling and even ringing in the ears as the brain is trying --and failing-- to process the noises. I feel that this use of the sounds are attempts to get us somewhat more into Florya's head, if only just a little.
On another note, I'm thoroughly convinced that Florya is legitimately losing his mind, and I feel like these sounds may be adding to the increasing disorder in his brain.

Michelle Lyn Luna

Posts : 21
Join date : 2012-11-15
Location : To-Be-Belarus, 1940s

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Sound Choice

Post  Aniesa on Fri Nov 16, 2012 10:52 pm

Exactly what i was thinking. The ringing was also what really got to me, moreso than the music, though i believe they are connected somehow since they both came about at the same time. But as i recall on some research i did sometime ago (i hate to bring it up again but i feel that from what ive experienced/researched i feel like i can relate it a bit), with Lavender Town's theme, what made it so creepy and scary was the pitch. A very high pitch that, for the most part, could only be heard through headphones or excellent hearing. This pitch was repeated every few beats about 10-15 seconds in. I think there were 2 frequencies playing at once(or 3), which it made so much harder to listen to for those who heard it. Now i'm not saying that the ringing or music the movie uses is the same exact thing, but i think they did something similiar to it which contributes to the audiences' unease throughout. Much like in Jaws how the music, again with a certain high frequency pitch, caused anxiety and suspence to those watching. I wouldn't put it past the director to go so far as to do that to the ringing or music. It serves to bring about a good reaction from those who watching.

Now about Florya going crazy, think you're onto something. I recall that on the Godfather, the subway was a way of showing Michael's internal struggle with situations, since the sound of it passingby would come about at the most crucial times. the ringing here could be serving the same purpose, or could also be an ongoing result of the explosions that happened, literally right next to him (behind him? in front of him?). But in time of war, could you blame him for going a bit loony? He's lost his family just after joining, when the whole purpose of him joining was to help protect them from the war. He also has the weight of the guilt of partially (maybe fully)causing the village to be attacked. This is a coming of age film, and no matter how much he thinks he was ready to take on the responsibility as an adult, he is still a child. So for a child to go through all of that, in such a short amount of time, he's bound to go crazy. Maybe that really is what the point of the constant ringing and melancholy tune is for?

Aniesa

Posts : 11
Join date : 2012-11-16

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Sound Choice

Post  Michelle Lyn Luna on Fri Nov 16, 2012 11:04 pm

That's some creepy stuff you learned about the music. And yeah, I definitely think the director planned whatever madness those pitches and ringings and tunes are.

I don't at all blame Florya for going a bit crazy, but the thought of him legitimately, fully losing his mind has been coming to my mind and just makes me think back to something Mr. Hart said at the beginning of this unit: that the coming-of-age stage is difficult, and there are those who don't make it out. I can't help but wonder if Florya is one of those, one who doesn't make it through the coming-of-age stage, at least not unscathed. If he makes it, I feel like he'll definitely be mentally and emotionally damaged beyond repair. And if such happens, does it really count as him successfully making it through?

Michelle Lyn Luna

Posts : 21
Join date : 2012-11-15
Location : To-Be-Belarus, 1940s

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Sound Choice

Post  Aniesa on Sat Nov 17, 2012 12:08 am

Yea, unfortunetly through my research I ended up having severe headaches from the frequencies. But hey, the information turned out to be useful for something, right?

Anyways, I see what you mean. I remember mr. hart saying that and now that you mention it, i can't help but think that may be a possibility. But if you put it that way, then if Glasha really is in her twenties or around it, then maybe she hasn't really made it through the coming of age stage? Since as posted before, she has already proven to have some kind of mental disorder or something. But like you said, maybe the war didn't cause her problems. So all of this really is up for speculation.

Aniesa

Posts : 11
Join date : 2012-11-16

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Sound Choice

Post  Admin on Sat Nov 17, 2012 9:40 am

There was a scientific study on the most disturbing noises to the human hear. Nearly all, if not all, of the top ten were frequencies in the high-pitch. Squeals almost. Fingernails on a chalkboard is the best example although that particular noise only ranked #3. In a different article, the statement was that there is a particular frequency, within that range, that has a way of startling and causing a fear reaction. The iconic shower scene from "Psycho" was cited as the prime example. I'm convinced it is the same sound as in the Jaws/dead body scene, but I haven't had that claim sourced yet.

Admin
Admin

Posts : 12
Join date : 2012-11-13

View user profile http://mrhartscinemastudies.greatestboard.com

Back to top Go down

Re: Sound Choice

Post  Austin Cruse on Sat Nov 17, 2012 12:55 pm

Also something that confuses me is why Florya is constantly covering his ears. If he has damage done to his eardrums, then he would be able to hear less, and wouldn't be covering his ears. Whenever something bad happens, he covers his ears. In the scene with the old man, Florya sticks his head into the ground, shutting himself away from everyone. When Glasha pulls him out, he immediately goes to cover his ears. If he is having trouble hearing everything else, then why is he covering his ears? I believe it definitely has a deeper meaning, but I'm not exactly sure what. Also, I wanted to look into Florya sticking his head into the ground . I remembered that ostriches have been know to stick their heads into the ground when they feel frightened or scared. In Native American culture, animals have been know to symbolize certain things such as courage, or fear, so I did some research on what an ostrich could mean. Maybe I've taken this into a direction the director didn't intend, but I found the ostrich can symbolize simplicity. Mr. Hart explained to us how children live easy lives because they don't know what is happening around their lives. He gave us the phrase "Ignorance is Bliss" and asked us to write about our thoughts on the phrase. I found that a synonym of Ignorance is simplicity. The director showing Florya having ostrich behavior could be him trying to tell us that he is trying to go back to him simple child life. I'm not exactly sure if this is the right approach to this scenes meaning, so I would appreciate your thoughts.

Austin Cruse

Posts : 3
Join date : 2012-11-16

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Sound Choice

Post  Michelle Lyn Luna on Sat Nov 17, 2012 1:28 pm

Glasha's coming-of-age is something I had never even considered before, though I certainly am now. Perhaps hers is important somewhat too, as Elaine's was in The Graduate? Not the main focus by any means, but still significant. Something to consider, indeed.

I want to say that Florya may be trying to block out mental noise rather than actual noise in the world when he covers his ears. Perhaps his thoughts or emotions (or mental-disorder-crazy-induced-voices-in-his-head) are too loud or distracting to him? I know when my thoughts are distracting and I just don't want to think anymore, I blast music. Drown out the thoughts, silence them.
The ostriches meaning simplicity would certainly make a lot of sense, I believe. And while it probably isn't too relevant at all, I can't help but be reminded of my research into storks --specifically how storks are very often compared to ostriches, especially in terms of maturity and complexity. And really, how likely is it that this director happens to make two, often compared, rather different birds major aspects of his film? Does coincidence even exist anymore? Did it ever?

Michelle Lyn Luna

Posts : 21
Join date : 2012-11-15
Location : To-Be-Belarus, 1940s

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Sound Choice

Post  Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum